Coming Attractions: SUMMER

The weird thing about working in education is that I still view the year starting at the end of August and ending at the end of May, just like I did when I was a student. Unfortunately, I’m no longer a student and I don’t get that nice summer vacation that my students do. Some professors and administrators (and other people who have no idea what we do in my office) think that we either don’t work during the summer or that the summer is incredibly slow. That couldn’t be farther from the truth! The summer is actually one of our busiest times of year – with fewer students on campus, there’s finally some time to do all the things we couldn’t finish during the school year. The first thing on that list for me is cleaning my office – I don’t even want to talk about what it looks like right now.

But enough about work…what am I doing with my summer?? Check it out below! (Okay, fine, some of these things will involve work…sorry.)

May

Classes just ended, so I’m listing all the fun stuff starting with this coming weekend…which is when I am going to see The Killers in concert again!! After that, I get to attend the annual Junior League dinner and chaperone a trip to Atlantic City. I get to bring a bus buddy, so my friend Kristy will be coming to AC with me. At the end of the month, I’ll be moving into my new apartment.

I saw The Killers last summer in concert. So excited to see them again!!

June

June kicks off with the Lilly Pulitzer Warehouse sale. I went last year with both my little and another sorority sister, Jackie. Jackie is coming back down again this year and I’m crossing my fingers that my favorite Lilly Pulitzer dress will be there and in my size.  I don’t think I have any other social plans for June, but I will be working on housing assignments for the incoming students which should take up quite a chunk of time.

This is what happens when sorority girls go to a Lilly Pulitzer sale AND outlet shopping in the same weekend.

July

July starts with a nice long weekend thanks to how the 4th of July holiday falls. I was on duty the last two 4th of July weekends, so I’m going to make sure I don’t have to take duty that weekend this year! I’m not sure what I’m going to do during 4th of July, but I’ve been discussing some ideas with my friends. Later that month is my family reunion in Upstate New York.

Lilly loves getting to go out on the boat.

August

Unfortunately I don’t get to do too much in August…we have RA training. We are changing up RA training so I’m actually looking forward to it. My birthday is in August, so I’ll have to celebrate it before training and after classes start.

Reno celebrating my birthday last year with some random Berks County hipsters.

…just noticed that I didn’t include cleaning my office on here…whoops. I’m hoping to cross a bunch of things off my list and hopefully add some new ones!

Junior League

I leave for my big Joplin trip tomorrow, so I figure I’ll just keep going with this week’s theme of volunteering!

Before I joined the Junior League, I had several different “pictures” of it in my mind. The first image that came to mind was a bunch of rich old ladies that wanted to do something good with all of their time and money. Next, I imagined a bunch of bored, rich, housewives…that view may have had something to do with “The Help“. So when somebody recommended that I join Junior League as a way to make friends, I was completely baffled! I didn’t think that I was old enough to join Junior League. But I decided to give it a try – at the very least, I thought I could maybe get some babysitting jobs out of it.

At my first meeting, I quickly learned that Junior League was NOTHING like I imagined. Yes, there were some rather well-off older women and some stay-at-home moms, but there were also working moms and single moms and unmarried professional women and recent college grads. Even though everybody had joined Junior League for different reasons, everybody supported our Junior League’s mission of helping kids in the Reading school district.

Similar to a sorority, my first year in Junior League I was considered a new member. We were welcome at the general meetings but also had our own new member meetings and planned a new member project. The ultimate goal of your new member year is to become familiar with ALL aspects of Junior League so that you can easily serve on a committee your next year.

I’m currently in my first active year and I am on the New Member Committee, so I am still attending all of the new member meetings and teaching the new members about Junior League. Each year you get “placed” with a different committee and while we don’t find out our placements until May, I’ve had a few people ask if I would be interested in a certain position, so I have a feeling where I’ll be heading next year!

Unfortunately with my work schedule, I haven’t been able to GO to every volunteer opportunity, but I try to help out behind the scenes. Last month I was able to spend most of my Saturday volunteering at Junior League’s Young Women’s Summit. Each year, the Junior League invites teenage girls from the Reading school district to come together for a weekend to learn leadership skills and discuss how they can improve their community. It was really fun to go an interact with the girls, but my favorite part was chatting with a former attendee that is now going to college and doing all sorts of awesome things. She came back to speak to the girls about her experiences prior to and during the summit. It was really emotional but at the end of her presentation, all of the current attendees told her how brave she was and that they looked up to her and admired her because she had worked hard, despite everything else going on in her life.

Joining Junior League has not only allowed me to meet people, but it has been an awesome way to get to know Reading and the surrounding areas. I’m excited to see what comes next!

Looking at the List #3

It’s been a busy week with Homecoming and all, but my ultimate goal is to get on some sort of regular posting schedule…of course I say that with ONE WEEK TO GO until I’m in Florida…so we’ll see how this goes…

24. Find out my blood type

I’m adopted which means there’s a whole slew of stuff  about myself that I don’t know. Medical history? No idea. Where my curly red hair came from? A friend’s mother joked that it came from the JCPenny’s catalog. I probably won’t know a lot of that stuff…but there is a test to find out my blood type. It’s just that that test requires a needle. To draw blood. Clearly you can see why I’ve put it off.

My REAL hope is that sometime in the next three-ish years, technology creates some cheap, easy, and pain-free way for me to know my blood type. If not, hopefully I can suck it up and go get the test done!

25. Watch the post-Elliott Stabler seasons of SVU

I first watched Law and Order SVU when I was in middle school. No, I didn’t have irresponsible parents…my religion teacher’s daughter played one of Detective Stabler’s daughters, so of course I wanted to see her on TV. Other than that, I really had no interest in the show. Later in life, I fell captive to one of USA’s SVU marathons. And by one I mean MANY. Seriously, if you find that USA is running a marathon of SVU and there is something that needs doing, do NOT turn on the TV.

One winter session, I decided to watch all of SVU on Netflix. By some miracle, it did NOT negatively affect the grade I got on my comprehensive exam. At the time, Netflix ONLY had the Stabler episodes – he had just left the show. I could have easily started watching the current episodes on whatever channel they air, but I liked Stabler, I didn’t want to see the show without him. I was afraid it would suck. However, it’s still on the air and I’m sure they’ve updated Netflix so I should probably check it out.

27. Have a conversation in ASL

RIT has NTID, the National Technical Institute for the Deaf, on its campus. About 10% of the student body was deaf or hard-of-hearing. I was used to classes with interpreters and c-print, captioning on all of the TVs, and seeing groups of students speaking with their hands. It wasn’t hard to learn ASL (American Sign Language) at RIT. They offered classes – both for credit and not-for-credit and had weekly “No Voice Zone” sessions. Additionally, everybody learned the “dirty” words quickly. I took the not-for-credit courses offered through NTID. They were $15 each quarter and were taught by NTID students. Fun fact – my ASL instructor later went on to become the first deaf contestant on Amazing Race!

While I was at RIT, my sign was okay…I’m not going to say I was good by any means…I have several friends that are interpreting majors, they’re good. I was able to practice signing frequently by talking with co-workers, sorority sisters, and classmates. Since leaving RIT, I really haven’t had the chance to use ASL. The local community class has ASL courses that I’ve thought of taking, but they’re a bit pricy.

Really, RIT is the only place that I know I can sign. The last time I visited, I wound up running into a sorority sister outside of the house and even though I had never met her before, we had an entire conversation in ASL. Granted, there was a lot of finger spelling on my end. Getting back to RIT is already on the list so hopefully while I’m there I can kill two birds with one stone!

29. $5 for every task NOT completed to charity

This one was definitely spotted on other lists! This is one that can’t be crossed off until the end and I have no clue what the amount is going to be. I’m also not sure of what charity I’m going to donate it to. Through Junior League, I’ve gotten to learn about local organizations that help the Reading area, so if I’m still in the area, maybe that’s where it will go to. Or maybe I’ll FINALLY answer RIT’s request for donations…HA!